Principal's Weekly Letter

Principal's Weekly Letter

 

June 13, 2019

Dear Beresford Families,                                                                               

 Thank you every one that came to our annual dance party on Friday, June 7th! Thank you Ms. Ginny and Mrs. Brogdon for being great hostesses and having fun with the kids dancing and playing games. Thank you to the teachers and staff that attended and made sure all the kids were having fun playing the games. Thank you Lauri Bowser for decorating the LGI in a fun luau theme! A special thank you to former parent, DJ Weinberg. The PTA does a wonderful job creating these wonderful community events for all families to enjoy and makes Beresford such a special school.

 Next week is our last week of school. Please remember the last day of school is Thursday, June 20th. ALL students are dismissed at 12:40pm. 5th grade promotion is on Thursday, June 20th at 11am. Students will be receiving their end of the year report card on Thursday.

 Summer Reading Challenge- Every student must participate!

We would like each family to choose one summer reading challenge this summer. Your choices are:

a.  The San Mateo Public Library https://smcl.org/blogs/post/take-the-2019-summer-learning-challenge/

b.   Barnes and Noble https://dispatch.barnesandnoble.com/content/dam/ccr/pdf/2019/summer-reading/123233A-05-bn-tear-sheet-bndotcom.pdf

c.    Beresford Summer Reading Challenge-every student has one given to them- please check their backpacks.

Please bring the completed challenge back to school the first week and receive a ticket for the Summer Reading Challenge Party in August during school!

 LINK to LEARNING- Summer Literacy Challenge!

http://www.readingrockets.org/article/summer-literacy-challenge

  • Investigate your public library's summer reading program. Most libraries offer a special program or two during the summer, including puppet shows, book authors and children's storytellers. Most are free of charge.
  • Extend your reading circle. We often find ourselves checking out the same types of books over and over again. This week's challenge is to bring a new type of book into the house. Consider fantasy or science fiction, historical fiction, poetry, biography, or an informational book.
  • Listen up! Audiobooks are a great way to engage readers and can introduce students to books above their reading level. Many libraries have audiobooks available for check out, and an Internet search can turn up several sites, including Speakaboos.com, that offer free audio books for children.
  • Make your own audio book! Most phones and computers have simple recording apps on them which are perfect for making homemade audio books! Have your child make up a story, or reread a favorite loved book. The recordings will be priceless!
  • Go wordless. Wordless picture books are told entirely through their illustrations — they are books without words, or sometimes just a few words. Grab a few wordless books the next time you're at the library and have fun "reading" different versions of the same story. The language and the conversation will inspire you!
  • Visit a museum, online! You'll be surprised by how much you can explore without leaving your house. One example is the Smithsonian Institution Kids site. It's complete with offerings from Art to Zoo, for kids and students of all ages.
  • Pack in a whole adventure! Find FREE themed reading adventure packs that encourage hands-on fun and learning, centered around paired fiction and nonfiction books. Visit the Reading Rockets Adventure Pack page.
  • Point, shoot, and write. Most families have access to a digital camera, iPad or camera phone. Snap some photos and then encourage your child to write a silly caption for each photo. Not feeling that ambitious? Cut out some pictures from a magazine or the newspaper and have your child write original captions for those.
  • Mix up the media. Your child has read every Clifford book on the shelf. But has she heard Clifford author Normal Bridwell talk about writing? Explore author interviews from over 100 authors on Reading Rockets Author Interview page. We'll bet you can't watch just one.
  • Write it down. Encourage your child to keep a simple journal or summer diary. Track interesting things like the number of fireflies seen in one minute, the number of mosquito bites on a leg, or the different types of food that can go on the grill. Each entry is a chance to be creative!

LIFESKILLS

This month’s LIFESKILLS sense of humor.

Sense of humor- to laugh and be playful without harming others
Having a sense of humor about ______ can make you feel _________________.
 

An article I read to promote a good sense of humor is found at http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/child-humor.html#. The article states:

A good sense of humor is a tool that kids can rely on throughout life to help them:

·         see things from many perspectives other than the most obvious

·         be spontaneous

·         grasp unconventional ideas or ways of thinking

·         see beyond the surface of things

·         enjoy and participate in the playful aspects of life

·         not take themselves too seriously

Kids with a well-developed sense of humor are happier and more optimistic, have higher self-esteem, and can handle differences (their own and others') well. Kids who can appreciate and share humor are better liked by their peers and more able to handle the adversities of childhood — from moving to a new town, to teasing, to torment by playground bullies.

What else can you do to encourage your child's sense of humor?

Be a humor model. One of the best things you can do to develop your child's sense of humor is to use your own. Make jokes. Tell funny stories. Laugh out loud. Deal lightly with small catastrophes like spilt milk.

Take kids' humor seriously. Encourage your child's attempts at humor, whether it's reading (potentially unfunny) jokes from a book or drawing "funny" pictures of the family dog. Praise your child for trying to be funny and be open to surprise — the first time your child makes you laugh is one of life's great pleasures.

Teach kids that adults are funny — and that they can be too. Make humor a part of your day-to-day interactions with your kids and encourage them to share funny observations or reactions, even when you're around other adults.

Create a humor-rich environment. Surround your kids with funny books — for toddlers and preschoolers these include picture books or nonsense rhymes; older kids will love joke books and comics. Also check out funny TV shows, movies, and websites for all age groups — help your child make good choices and then enjoy them too.

This week’s reminders are:

·         Last Day of School Reminder

·         First Day of School Reminder

·         Medication Reminder

·         Join School Site Council

·         K-4 School Supply List

·         PTA

·         Stay Sharp During the Summer

·         Summer Lunch Program

 

Have a great week and please continue to use B.E.A.R. reading at home and at school,

 

Amy Snow

http://beresford.smfcsd.net/